Sunday, January 1, 2012

Politically incorrect-Miracle man

The death of Sri Sathya Sai Baba has spread gloom throughout the country and many parts of the world. Are these miracle men or god men for real, as they claim to be? The place of a miracle man has fallen vacant with the death of Sathya Sai Baba. Who will be the next to claim the post?

With all due respect to the departed soul, I wonder why these god men have to perform miracles to prove they have super powers. Why do they have to claim that they are incarnations of god? Why do they have to amass wealth that they know, is going to create chaos after their death?

Just give a thought to the sages of the past like Ramkrishna Paramhans, Shirdi Sai Baba etc. They never claimed themselves to be incarnations of god. On the contrary they considered themselves to be servants of the almighty. They never amassed wealth, lived in abject poverty and performed miracles only in utter necessity never boasting about their super powers. They lead a simple life and in spite of having large followings, always remained humble.

Now look at all the recent god men – Asaram Bapu, Baba Ramdev, Rajneesh, Chandra Swami, Mahesh Yogi among others. All are or were surrounded in one or more controversies. Even Sathya Sai Baba was not without one. All of them are exceptionally rich. They preach of tyaga (renouncement) and saiyam (control). But look at each one of them. They live in super luxuries, have large mansions, fleet of cars and several are involved in sex scandals. Bhagwan Rajneesh had 93 Rolls Roys cars. He was deported from US on charges of immigration fraud. Chandra Swami did more political activities then spiritual service. He was more like Niira Radia in the garb of a spiritual leader. And yet people follow them blindly, even educated ones. They have political patronage. They leave behind greed, chaos and internal quarrels. Do we really need them? You think.

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Header image credit: adapted from David Niblack

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